Image-based Typography in Photoshop

Wonder how an image is turned into texts? Using texts with varying fonts, sizes, colors and opacity into an image or to your photo is something you’ll enjoy with such amazing results! With simple steps, you can turn your photo into a colorful stuff, done in Photoshop.

Preview

Preview

Step 1. Open photo in Photoshop

Image below is a picture of Scarlett Johansson and can be can be found here. You may use your own photo if you prefer to.

Scarlett Johansson

Scarlett Johansson

Step 2. Creating the shadows

What we are trying to do here is to make a dark contrast out of the photo so that the texts that we’ll be typing on will be effective as we apply layer mask into it. That will follow in the next couple of steps.

To do this, go to Select>Color Range… then select Shadows. As a result, a selection of the dark parts is loaded and you can see kind of running ants on the photo. Now, press Ctrl+J to create a layer (Layer 1) for this.

Shadows

Shadows

Shadows Layer

Shadows Layer

Step 3. Midtones

There are areas where it’s not totally black nor white, they are gray actually, and we will include it along with the shadows that we earlier made. This is so because as as we type the texts later, the effect will be lighter in opacity compared to that of the shadows (which is black), and that will give an added highlight to the image outcome.

So, go back to your background layer, then like as we did to the previous step, but this time select Midtones. When done, press Ctrl+J to create its own layer (Layer 2).

s3a-horz

Step 4. Shadow Fill

Activate Layer 1, then go to Edit>Fill… and select Black. Ba sure to check Transparency. You’ll notice that the shadows is enhanced and now more pronounced.

Fill Dialog Box

Fill Dialog Box

Fill Result

Fill Result

Step 5. Midtones Fill

Ok, like we did to Shadows, we’ll fill the midtones layer also but, this time, fill it with 50% gray. To do this, be sure to activate Layer 2 (midtones layer) first.

Gray Fill

Gray Fill

Gray Fill Result

Gray Fill Result

Step 6. Creating Text Brushes

We now need to create text brushes as we will be using in the next step. So, meantime, we’ll leave our work temporarily and create a new document. The size of the document is not that important really because we can adjust anytime the brush size as we go along. But to minimize, small size is better.

New Document

New Document

So, after a blank document is done, type the text that you want, preferably short. After this, go to Edit>Define Brush Preset…

Text and Brush Name

Text and Brush Name

Text Layer

Text Layer

Make plenty of text brushes, one at a time, with different font style and sizes. The more is better (and merrier!).

Step 7. Brushing Time!

Before we start the fun, create a new layer first above all the layers. This will serve as our brushing area.

Brush Layer

Brush Layer

Now, go grab your Brush Tool and select Brush. Click Brush Tip and adjust the Size and Spacing. Drag left or right to adjust. Brush all over the photo. It’s okay if not all filled with text brushes as that will be fixed later.

Brush Settings

Brush Settings

Step 8. White fill layer

Create a new layer below the topmost layer. Fill this with white (with white set to FG, click Alt+Backspace).

White Layer

White Layer

Step 9. Copy and Paste Merged Shadows and Midtones

Hide layers 3 and 4. Activate layer 2, select and copy (Ctrl+A then Ctrl+C).Unhide layers 3 and 4 now, then make a layer mask on Layer 3 (that one filled with texts).

Paste the copied layer (eg, Layer 2) into the layer mask by pressing Alt+Click. Hold Ctrl then press V, D, I simultaneously.

Ctrl+V

Ctrl+V

Ctrl+D

Ctrl+D

Ctrl+I

Ctrl+I

Step 10. More brushing

As mentioned earlier, we’ll fix the text brush area by applying more brushes until fully filled or contented. But first, click layer mask thumbnail (not the mask, but the one filled with text brushes). Okay, go on and brush more to the image as you wish. Give particular attention to the eyes and edges of the model.

Here’s how it should look like after rebrushing:

Rebrushing

Rebrushing

Step 11. Finishing touches

Enhance your work by applying Curves and/or Levels, Color fill, hue/saturation or maybe gradient overlay to make your product colorful and even more interesting.

Here’s how I came up:

Final Image

Final Image

Colorful Image Typography

PREVIEW

In this tutorial, we’re going to make a typographic poster from a simple photo using Photoshop techniques. I haven’t done something like this before despite the fact that I started doing typography both in GIMP and Photoshop. Filling out an image with different fonts appears so cool to me and it inspires me to do one.

The described effects look nice on portraits or any other images with good contrast and light background, but you can easily adjust the contrast and make the background lighter using the different tools and filters in Photoshop.

Step 1 : Choose your photo

In Adobe Photoshop, open your chosen image and adjust the contrast (Image>Adjustments>Brightness/Contrast…). The image used can be downloaded HERE.

Step 2 : Create various text brushes

Create a new document (File>New) in a size that’s smaller than your photo: the specifics don’t really matter. Press D to set the Foreground color to black. Use the Type tool (T) to type several different words in various fonts and sizes (in this case we used a person’s name). One at a time, draw a selection around each word with the Rectangular Marquee tool (M), and from the Edit menu, choose Define Brush Preset. Name each brush in the Brush Name dialog and click OK.

Step 3 : Selecting the shadows

Switch back to the photograph (Background layer). From the Select menu, choose Color Range. From the Select drop-down menu in the Color Range dialog, choose Shadows and click OK. (In our example, nothing in the background was selected. If parts of the background are selected in your photo, see the next step for removing those selected areas.)

Then, press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to copy the selected pixels onto a new layer. Press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to copy the selected pixels onto a new layer. Click back on the Background layer in the Layers panel to activate it.

Step 4 : Selecting the Midtones

Go back to the Select menu and choose Color Range again. From the Select drop-down menu in the Color Range dialog, choose Midtones and click OK. If (as in this example) some of the background is selected, use the Lasso tool (L) with the Option key (PC: Alt key) held down to circle the areas you don’t want selected. Then, press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to copy the selected pixels onto a new layer.

Step 5 : Fill the layers with black and gray

Click the Eye icon next to the Background layer in the Layers panel to hide that layer from view. Click on the midtones layer (Layer 2) and from the Edit menu choose Fill. Use 50% Gray, check the Preserve Transparency box, and click OK. Then, activate the shadow layer (Layer 1) and use the Fill command again, except this time use Black with Preserve Transparency checked. You should have a very basic portrait made from black and 50% gray.

Step 6 : Fine-tune the results and merge down layers

If necessary, show the original Background (click where the Eye icon used to be) and use the Brush tool (B) to paint with black on the shadow layer, gray on the midtones layer, or use the Eraser tool (E) to completely remove areas. (Note: For gray, click on the Foreground color swatch, enter R:128, G:128, and B:128 in the Color Picker, and click OK.) In this example, we added a little more definition to the ears by painting with gray on the midtones layer. Once you’re satisfied, click on the top layer (the shadow layer) and press Command-E (PC: Ctrl-E) to merge it with the midtones layer.

Step 7 : Adjust brush settings and apply some texts

Click the Create a New Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. Press D to set your default colors. Press Command-Delete (PC: Ctrl-Backspace) to fill the new layer with white. Choose one of your custom brushes from the Brush Picker in the Options Bar, and in the Brushes panel (Window>Brushes), click on the words “Brush Tip Shape.” Adjust the Spacing so there’s space between each word. Under Shape Dynamics, vary the size and rotation of the brush. As you paint on the white layer, experiment with the Shape Dynamics. Repeat with your other custom brushes. For now, just get some “text paint” on the layer—we’ll continue painting in a moment.

Step 8 : Copy the image

Create a new layer and drag it above the black-and-gray portrait layer. Press Command-Delete (PC: Ctrl-Backspace) to fill it with white. This will provide a white background behind our image. Hide all the layers except the black-and-gray portrait layer, and then click on that layer to make it active. Press Command-A (PC: Ctrl-A) to Select All and then Command-C (PC: Ctrl-C) to Copy.

Step 9 : Paste image into the layer mask

Show all layers and activate the layer with the painted words. Click on the Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel to add a layer mask. Hold down Option (PC: Alt) and click on the layer mask thumbnail (this will hide the painted text and show just the mask). Press Command-V (PC: Ctrl-V) to paste the copied pixels onto the mask. Press Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D) to Deselect. Press Command-I (PC: Ctrl-I) to Invert the mask (your mask should look like a negative of the black-and-gray pixel image that you pasted).

Step 10 : Add more texts with varying brushes

Activate the painted text layer (not the mask) by clicking on the layer thumbnail, and continue painting using the different custom brushes you created. You can also continue to experiment with the brush settings for Size, Spacing, and Shape Dynamics. (Although you don’t need a pressure sensitive pen for this technique, it sure helps!)

Step 11 : Add a new layer with random texts

The painted text will only appear inside the white and gray areas of the mask. To add a bit more randomness to the portrait, add a new layer above the painted text layer. Then use the same text brushes to add a few words here and there outside the boundaries of the mask.

Step 12 : Apply Gradient

With the image with layer mask active, click the New fill icon below the layers palette then select Gradient…Choose the yellow, red, blue gradient in the selection box, click Ok. Set blend mode to Overlay.

And here’s the final result:

Flame Text in Photoshop

Creating your own logo, wallpaper, theme, greeting cards, blog titles, or anything that necessitate texts or fonts is somewhat fulfilling and fun. Why? It’s because you create yourself what exactly you want. If you know already the basics and quite familiar with Photoshop, it will be easy for you to follow the steps and technique in creating various text effects. Don’t worry much if your creation don’t look so perfect because that is achieved gradually (a lot of time and practice, actually). What will matter most anyway is that if you are happy with your work and continuously striving to improve it.

Well, here, I’ll show you how to create a flame-effect text using Photoshop, step-by-step.

1. Selecting the Background and Foreground Colors.

By default, your BG/FG colors is set to black/white, and interchangeable. We’ll use this temporarily.
Or, as in this tutorial, you may use a grungy-textured background.

2. Select Font, Type Text, and Blending Options

Select a relatively big font. I use Trajan Pro, 72px.
Type the text you want to appear and work with, like “APOY” which I use here, then duplicate it. The duplicated text layer (“apoy”) will now appear as “apoy copy”.
Double-click the “apoy copy” layer in the dialog box, then proceed with the following Blending Option settings:

check Outer Glow, then click Ok.
double-click Outer Glow in the layer dialog box, click the color box, and set the color to #ffb017; click Ok.
double-click again Outer Glow in the layer dialog box, this time, click Inner Glow style, Opacity to 100, color to #ff9c00, size to 11px.

3. Setting the Flame

Select the Smudge Tool and set the following settings: Hardness=25, Strength=75, Diameter=20.
With the “apoy copy” selected, use Smudge Tool to make wisps of flames each of the typed letters (e.g., APOY).

4. Enhancing the Flames

Turn the “apoy copy” into a selection by holding down Ctrl key and clicking its layer icon in the layers dialog.
Inverse the selection by going to Select>Inverse.
Press Delete key.
Deselect by pressing Ctrl + D.
Turn the “flame copy” again into a selection by holding Ctrl key and clicking its icon in the layer dialog box.
Create a new layer by clicking the new layer icon located below the layer dialog box.
Bring up the Fill dialog window by pressing Shift + Backspace and, under Contents, select White. Click Ok.
Deselect by pressing Ctrl + D.
Set the blending mode to Overlay.

5. Optional (Type a quotation under the typed text)

Blending Options>Effects settings: (check the following)

> Drop Shadow
> Bevel and Emboss
> Color Overlay
> Satin
By the way, I added a border from one of Photoscape’s border selections. Below is the final outcome.

So, that’s it!